Jamaica’s Gem, Safira Mono Preps For West Coast Tour!

Multifacet Reggae singer-songwriter-actress, Safira Mono brings ancient wisdom to our modern age with her upful, vibrant, positive lyrics and dynamic stage presence.

Following the release of her 2018 album titled “Just A Woman,” the Reggae sensation has been assiduously campaigning. When asked about her flagship track “I Pray For You” featuring Morgan Heritage, the Spanish Town Gem had this to say: “I apprecilove the support I’ve gotten from the Morgan family. The single has propelled the growth of my fanbase, especially in Ghana, Japan, and the United States.”

Meanwhile celebrating the success of her album & distribution with Zojak, the warrior empress has been prepping with her five-piece band for an eventful 2019. “I love the west coast vibration!” Safira Mono exclaims.With words of empowerment and militancy, Safira Mono was introduced to the west coast masses on the likes of, KZCT 89.5 FM, KZSC 88.1 FM, & KPFA 94.1 FM.

Safira Mono readies album

SAFIRA Mono is gearing up for the release of her debut album, Just a Womanin the first quarter of 2018. The reggae album will feature 16 tracks and will be released through her own distribution arm, Jample.

“This my first official album and I am excited about it. The album is produced by a number of local producers such as DreZion, Quick Mix, and Stick a Fire. Songs such as Monitor, Cruff Life, and I Am Not A Toy are on the album, and there are collaborations with Sizzla and Morgan Heritage. Another collaboration, Do it to Jah, will feature UK band, House of Riddims and will be the lead single,” said Safira Mono.

She had previously released the I Am Not A Toy EP in 2016.

In the meantime, she is getting rave reviews for the video of her latest single, Cruff Life which features 18th-century slavery theme complete with a great house, sweating field slaves and white slave owners.

“We are still experiencing the after-effects of slavery, so the video is a commentary on that oppression, a kind of history lesson for the youths,” said the artiste, whose real name is Shockera Pinnock.

Since its release, the video has racked up over 150,000 views on Facebook, several thousand on Instagram and YouTube, and also popped up on the video countdown charts on the popular Street Link and FiWi Choice charts.

The music video was shot and directed by Wayne Benjamin, with the script written by Safira Mono herself. The video was shot at the Cherry Gardens Great House. The single was released under the Frassout Records imprint and has been available on iTunes since August 25, 2017.

“The battle continues. We are not destined to be cruffs, don’t believe the lie. We have to accept the legacy and then with that acceptance, we can break the chains,” she said.

Safira Mono says “Cruff Life” hanging scene will not lead youths to suicide

Reggae artiste Safira Mono is getting rave reviews for the theme tackled in her latest video, ‘Cruff Life’, which features a 18th century slavery theme complete with a Great House, sweating field slaves and white slave owners.

However, a hanging scene in the video has caught the attention of the Broadcasting Commission which is concerned that “exposure to graphic or sensationalized accounts of death, can endanger youth”.
Safira Mono does not agree.
“Cruff Life is a song for ghetto youths who are going through hard life and those who are fighting discrimination, rejection, oppression, racism, poverty, and slavery with righteousness. It won’t cause suicides, or romanticising of death, the hanging is about the victimisation of black people. We are still experiencing the after-effects of slavery, so the video is a commentary on that oppression, a kind of history lesson for the youths,” the artiste whose real name is Shockera Pinnock, said.

 

Since its release, the video has racked up over 100,000 views on Facebook, and popped up on the video countdown charts on the popular Street Link and FIWI Choice charts. However, one particular scene has ruffled the feathers of the Broadcasting Commission.
“The Broadcasting Commission has a problem with the hanging scene to the extent that Mello TV has said that they cannot play the video unless we edit it out,” she said.
The Broadcasting Commission is an independent statutory agency mandated by the Broadcasting and Radio Re-diffusion Act (BRRA) to monitor and regulate free-to-air television, broadcast radio and subscriber television (Cable) services. Mental health experts say that certain images in broadcast media could pose health risks for certain young people, such as those who have suicidal thoughts.
However, Mono believes that there is a unique opportunity to have a conversation about suicide and censorship is not the answer.
“If it is suicide they are worried about, this provides a valuable opportunity to discuss suicide risk with young people. In fact, publicity and awareness can actually push people to get help and identify warning signs instead of taking their own lives,” she said.
The music video was shot and directed by Wayne Benjamin, with the script written by Safira Mono herself. The video was shot at the Cherry Gardens great house. The single was released under the Frassout Records imprint and has been available on iTunes since August 25, 2017.
Safira Mono, who is known for the hit single,’ Monitor’, recently performed at the Marcus Garvey celebrations hosted by IRIE FM. She is a firebrand rastafarian fighting for righteousness in a decadent time.
“The battle continues, we are not destined to be cruffs, don’t believe the lie. We have to accept the legacy and then with that acceptance, we can break the chains,” she said.

Safira Mono continues the struggle

Reggae artiste Safira Mono is getting rave reviews for her latest video CruffLife , which features an 18th-century slavery theme complete with a Great House, sweating field slaves, and white slave owners.

“ Cruff Life is a song for ghetto youths who are going through hard life and those who are fighting discrimination, rejection, oppression, racism, poverty and slavery with righteousness. One way or another we are still experiencing the after-effects of slavery, so the video is a commentary on that oppression — a kind of history lesson for the youths,” said Safira Mono, whose real name is Shockera Pinnock.

The music video was shot and directed by Wayne Benjamin, with the script written by Safira Mono. The video was shot at the Cherry Gardens Great House.

The single was released under the Frassout Records imprint and has been available on iTunes since August 25.

“The video took almost four months to produce,” she said.

Safira Mono believes the legacy of slavery has translated into a crippling, modern-day poverty where generations of people find themselves trapped in a life without access to health and education resources and hence, doomed to relive the mistakes of their ancestors.

“For the Cruff Life music video, I wanted to go deeper than the urban poverty of zinc fences and ‘back-a-walls’ because cruff life did not start there. Why are we in the predicament that we are in today? Aren’t we free? No, because freedom is not money, it is not living pay cheque to pay cheque; it is not flossing, quick money and pretending a new reality because we have material things. We are still in slavery and that cruff life began in the slavery era,” she said .

She said the lure of celebrity and status is a weapon that creates a nation of “modern-day slaves”.

“They want us to be slaves to the idea of big houses, slaves to our cellphones, slaves to our jobs, all at the expense of our humanity. the only way to be free is through the pursuit of knowledge, and breaking the mental chains,” the artiste said.

Safira Mono, who is known for the hit single Monitor, recently performed at the Marcus Garvey celebrations in St Ann. She is a firebrand Rastafarian fighting for righteousness in a decadent time.

“The battle continues. we are not destined to be cruffs, don’t believe the lie. We have to accept the legacy and then with that acceptance, we can break the chains,” she said.

Entertainer Safira Mono, launches scathing attacks on artists and their cosmetic surgeries!

Reggae artist Safira Mono has launched a scathing attack on the alarming number of dancehall personalities and public figures who have undertaken cosmetic surgeries in recent times.

She labeled these public figures, who have had breast and butt enhancement procedures done, as “mindless puppets” who are carrying out the mandate of a society intent on creating a poor, frustrated and intellectually bankrupt underclass.

“There are certain media puppets out there – intelligent women who ought to know better, but because they have a media platform, they can act the fool. I don’t blame them for hating themselves and pretending as if they are happy, but I have a problem when they attempt to mislead the youths. They were taught to do so by an entrenched system of corruption which begins in school and church,” Safira Mono said.

She said the lure of celebrity and status is a weapon that creates a nation of “modern-day slaves”.

“They want us to be slaves to the idea of big houses, slaves to our cell phones, slaves to our jobs, all at the expense of our humanity,” Safira Mono said.

“These women are seen as celebrities, and the negro youths are their biggest fans, and they are my biggest concern. Puppets are trend followers and would do anything for the endorsements and the spotlight or to get likes at the expense of the children losing their innocence. They are creating a system of economic slavery, psychological slavery, and spiritual slavery by dangling unrealistic body images and a false lifestyle for the youths,” she added.

Self-hate

She believes that the rash of recent cosmetic surgeries is a mere symptom of the self-hate.

“It is like telling the Almighty God, the Creator of all things, that He was wrong when He created us. So we correct God. This issue is a vexing one for the black race because it also shows lack of confidence in self – a condition which the black race is suffering from – although some are still unaware that they are suffering from self- hate,” she said.

Safira Mono, who is known for her song, Monitor, recently performed at the Marcus Garvey celebrations hosted by IRIE FM. She is a firebrand Rastafarian fighting for righteousness in a decadent time.

In addition, she will be releasing a new single, Cruff Life, along with an accompanying music video next week.

Safira Mono brings positive message to prisoners at spanish town

Fresh on the heels of signing a distribution deal with VPAL for her breakthrough single Monitor, Safira Mono has scored with prisoners at the Spanish Town prison. The conscious reggae artiste recently performed at the prison where she sang Monitor and other tracks from her upcoming album, Just a Woman.

“Everyone was singing along when I did Monitor, it was a great moment. When I left the stage, they were hungry for more,” Mono told Entertainment Avenue. Mono said the prison authorities were very pleased with the positive message that she brought to the prisoners through her songs.

The performance at the penal institution came as the artiste continues celebrating the success of Monitor and the signing of a distribution deal with VPAL, a subsidiary of VP Records, for distributing the song worldwide. “The distribution deal with VPAL was signed in Kingston last month, and Monitor has now been released internationally,” she said. Written by Mono and produced by Bad Slave Pinnacle, the song calls upon parents to monitor their children, while at the same time seeks to uplift both parents and children. “The youths really need to be monitored by not just the parents but by every responsible adult,” she argued.

The video for Monitor, done by Wayne Benjamin, continues to rack up viewings on YouTube. The artiste says she is happy with the progress she has made in the music industry so far. “I’ve been trying for a while and had to put up with a lot of fight, especially because I’m a female. A lot of people were saying that I’m not marketable, but I feel good that they don’t have the last talk. Now that Monitor is a hit, a lot of people are saying they can relate to the song.” The success, so far, of Monitor has spurred Mono to push for the completion of her debut album, Just a Woman, which should be complete by year-end. It is scheduled for a 2017 release.

Explaining the reasoning for the title, Mono said, “I don’t call myself an entertainer or artiste, I am just a woman, so that title is quite appropriate.” She added that fans who have been following her career will love the album, as it will contain “a lot of heart and soul”. “It has real lyrics, based on struggles, based on love and reality.

The album is going to be very, very creative and will be kind of different, but with lots of great songs. It’s an album that I am dedicating to my late mother and to my father, who I met only recently for the first time.” I’m Just a Woman is being produced by Dre Zion and Quick Mix Records, and will contain 10 songs along with bonus tracks.

Safira Mono ‘mentoring’ Jamaican youth

 

Though she grew up in a middle-class home in Tryall Heights, Spanish Town, deejay Safira Mono saw up-front the challenges of urban life in her community.

Her experience working with youth in some of Jamaica’s toughest neighbourhoods inspiredMentoring, her latest song.

“Them (youth) must know them can achieve. When I was a child my mother told me I can do anything,” she said.

Safira Mono has mentored youth in her hometown, as well as the ‘Backbush’ area of Mountain View; Arnett Gardens (aka Jungle), Rema, Jones Town and Tivoli Gardens.

Each community has a long history of gang and political violence, poverty and teen pregnancy.

Mentoring was co-produced by Safira Mono’s Bad Slave Pinnacle label, Tenement Yard Records and Quick Mix Records.

Recording since 2007, her previous songs like Harder TimesI Am Not A Toy and Cruff Life have social themes.

Reaching out to the marginalised, especially the young, is her priority.

“Mi want to embrace the youth who don’t hear positive things in their homes and from people. I want them to know they have greatness,” she said.

FEATURED PHOTO: Safira Mono with children in the Backbush area of Mountain View, Kingston.